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[fancy-title type=”h4″]Pest Description[/fancy-title]

The Rasberry crazy ant was first discovered in Texas in 2002 by a Houston-area pest control operator named Tom Rasberry, who lends his name to the invasive ant species.

Crazy ants feed primarily on live and dead insects, seeds, fruits and honeydew. They are found throughout the U.S., but are confined to the indoors in the northern states because they cannot survive the winter outdoors. Caribbean crazy ants enter homes in the autumn or after rainfall because both conditions reduce their supply of honeydew.

Crazy ants feed primarily on live and dead insects, seeds, fruits and honeydew. They are found throughout the U.S., but are confined to the indoors in the northern states because they cannot survive the winter outdoors. Caribbean crazy ants enter homes in the autumn or after rainfall because both conditions reduce their supply of honeydew.

Caribbean crazy ants do not pose a health threat, but if they gain entry to a structure, they can become a nuisance.

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[fancy-title type=”h4″]Pest Stats[/fancy-title]

Color:
Usually red, black or a combination
Legs:
: 6
Shape:
Segmented; oval
Size:
5/8″
Antennae:
Yes
Region:
Throughout U.S., most common in the North

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